ROE v. DBA Jesus Christ (U.S.S.C) 2017

5 Stars

ROE v. DBA Jesus Christ (U.S.S.C) 2017

Good Morning Family and Friends

It is a nice morning in New York City. The weather seems to be a little humid. But overall, it is the type of day, when you might want to get you a bottle of water and take a walk and adopts block.

To adopt a block is to go somewhere in your neighborhood or one of a friend or family and clean up the area and show some type of self-love and pride for self, family, community, nation and God.

If a contractor sees potential in this development, he will b attracted by a loving and welcoming community of people, wanting a better way for their children, who are tomorrow and make tomorrow today.

In Washington D.C., they use this type of ordinance to help give community residents and passer byers a safe haven from all types of unconstitutional acts of aggression against the poor and other the Veteran’s community, because everybody knew until today, “Veteran don’t get Veteran Benefits.” So who does? The criminals, who took over America. The criminals, for good is bad, so the baddy, baddie is called the good guys or Wise Guys. The undercover FBI Informant, who call the FBI the Full Blooded Italians.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whistleblower_Protection_Act

This is constitutional, because you can tell on someone for doing something wrong and if they are found to have violated the constitution, then that person must stand as a witness. Therefore the basis for assuming the investigation was based on a credible witness and not an adversarial decision based on personal issues.

But if that person is found to have not done ant wrong doings, that person, should know why this investigation took place. Therefore these Whistleblowers should be imported by the new Veterans calls to Arms, granting jobs in the right places, based on VETS First.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witness_protection

What the Law Implies – The Organized Crime Control Act of 1970

The Organized Crime Control Act of 1970 (Pub.L. 91–452, 84 Stat. 922 October 15, 1970), was an Act of Congress sponsored by Democratic Senator John L. McClellan[1] and signed into law by U.S. President Richard Nixon.

The Act was the product of two sets of hearings in the Senate, the Select Committee on Improper Activities in Labor and Management hearings of 1957-1959 and the McClellan hearings of 1962-1964.

The Act prohibits the creation or management of a gambling organization involving five or more people if it has been in business more than 30 days or accumulates $2,000 in gross revenue in a single day. It also gave grand juries new powers, permitted detention of unmanageable witnesses, and gave the U.S. Attorney General authorization to protect witnesses, both state and federal, and their families.[2] This last measure helped lead to the creation of WITSEC, an acronym for witness security.

Part of the Act created the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.[3]

 

The Basis of such Needed Protections:

United States

Further information: United States Federal Witness Protection Program

The United States established a formal program of witness protection, run by the U.S. Marshal Service, under the Organized Crime Control Act of 1970. Before that, witness protection had been instituted under the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871 to protect people testifying against members of the Ku Klux Klan. Earlier in the 20th century, the Federal Bureau of Investigation also occasionally crafted new identities to protect witnesses.[15]

Many states, including California, Connecticut, Illinois, New York and Texas, as well as Washington, D.C., have their own witness protection programs for crimes not covered by the federal program. The state-run programs provide less extensive protections than the federal program. They also cannot hold or have as many people involved as the federal program.[16][17][18]

Before witness protection funds can be sought, law enforcement must conduct an assessment of the threat or potential for danger. This assessment includes an analysis of the extent the person or persons making the threats appear to have the resources, intent, and motivation to carry out the threats and how credible and serious the threats appear to be. When threats are deemed credible and witnesses request law enforcement assistance, witness protection funds can be used to provide assistance to witnesses which helps law enforcement keep witnesses safe and help ensure witnesses appear in court and provide testimony.[19]

Special arrangements, known as S-5 and S-6 visas, also exist to bring key alien witnesses into the US from overseas.[20] T visas may be used to admit into the United States victims of human trafficking willing to assist in prosecuting the traffickers.[21]

The Enforcement Act of 1871 (17 Stat. 13), also known as the Civil Rights Act of 1871, Force Act of 1871, Ku Klux Klan Act, Third Enforcement Act, or Third Ku Klux Klan Act, is an Act of the United States Congress which empowered the President to suspend the writ of habeas corpus to combat the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) and other white supremacy organizations. The act was passed by the 42nd United States Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant on April 20, 1871. The act was the last of three Enforcement Acts passed by the United States Congress from 1870 to 1871 during the Reconstruction Era to combat attacks upon the suffrage rights of African Americans. The statute has been subject to only minor changes since then, but has been the subject of voluminous interpretation by courts.

This legislation was asked for by President Grant and passed within one month of the president’s request for it to Congress. Grant’s request was a result of the reports he was receiving of widespread racial threats in the Deep South, particularly in South Carolina. He felt that he needed to have his authority broadened before he could effectively intervene. After the act’s passage, the president had the power for the first time to both suppress state disorders on his own initiative and to suspend the right of habeas corpus. Grant did not hesitate to use this authority on numerous occasions during his presidency, and as a result the first era KKK was completely dismantled and did not resurface in any meaningful way until the first part of the 20th century.[1] Several of its provisions still exist today as codified statutes. The most important of these is 42 U.S.C. § 1983: Civil action for deprivation of rights.

The Basis Review:

The KKK v. Organized Crime or Civil Law v. Criminal Law

The Enforcement Act of 1871 (17 Stat. 13), also known as the Civil Rights Act of 1871, Force Act of 1871, Ku Klux Klan Act, Third Enforcement Act, or Third Ku Klux Klan Act, is an Act of the United States Congress which empowered the President to suspend the writ of habeas corpus to combat the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) and other white supremacy organizations. The act was passed by the 42nd United States Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant on April 20, 1871. The act was the last of three Enforcement Acts passed by the United States Congress from 1870 to 1871 during the Reconstruction Era to combat attacks upon the suffrage rights of African Americans. The statute has been subject to only minor changes since then, but has been the subject of voluminous interpretation by courts.

This legislation was asked for by President Grant and passed within one month of the president’s request for it to Congress. Grant’s request was a result of the reports he was receiving of widespread racial threats in the Deep South, particularly in South Carolina. He felt that he needed to have his authority broadened before he could effectively intervene. After the act’s passage, the president had the power for the first time to both suppress state disorders on his own initiative and to suspend the right of habeas corpus. Grant did not hesitate to use this authority on numerous occasions during his presidency, and as a result the first era KKK was completely dismantled and did not resurface in any meaningful way until the first part of the 20th century.[1] Several of its provisions still exist today as codified statutes. The most important of these is 42 U.S.C. § 1983: Civil action for deprivation of rights.

 

42 U.S.C. Statute 1983

Every person who, under color of any statute, ordinance, regulation, custom, or usage, of any State or Territory or the District of Columbia, subjects, or causes to be subjected, any citizen of the United States or other person within the jurisdiction thereof to the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured by the Constitution and laws, shall be liable to the party injured in an action at law, suit in equity, or other proper proceeding for redress, except that in any action brought against a judicial officer for an act or omission taken in such officer’s judicial capacity, injunctive relief shall not be granted unless a declaratory decree was violated or declaratory relief was unavailable. For the purposes of this section, any Act of Congress applicable exclusively to the District of Columbia shall be considered to be a statute of the District of Columbia.

(R.S. § 1979; Pub. L. 96–170, § 1, Dec. 29, 1979, 93 Stat. 1284; Pub. L. 104–317, title III, § 309(c), Oct. 19, 1996, 110 Stat. 3853.)

 

ROE v. DBA Jesus Christ (U.S.S.C) 2017

A Precedent Supreme Court Decision – Based on Writ of Certiorari by DBA Jesus Christ

This is a precedence setting case, based on the proper interpretation of ROE v. Wade, the 5th Amendment, Mapp v. Ohio and Miranda v. Arizona. And also it is supported by the essence of the Department of Families and Children and the offices of Probation and Parole. In that all persons have a right to advocacy, rather an in-emancipated child, one who is retarded under the law or one who has be judicially injured.

And the consequence for doing these types of unconstitutional acts, clearly places the convicted person(s) of the decision of indictments based on 42 U.S.C. Statute 1983.

In ROE v. Wade, two things was made very clear, 1. Marriage is unconstitutional, due to this woman having the right to choose without any joint discussions with her husband, who did not want her to get an abortion.

But then we had to define abortion. To abort it to prevent, before conception, because life begins at conception. Actually this case was her conviction. Yes, you had the right to an abortion, but that child was a living fetus and that constitutes murder in the 1st degree.

Then comes the question of rights to all humankind. As sure as we allow Forster Care to operate and place person’s on probation and parole and have a failing education system, people not only have a right to an advocate, but it is the duty of this nation to provide them to each and every person whose rights are being violated. Therefore that unborn child, had a right to a guardian advocate to prevent her mother from murdering her. Just as we remove a child from a home of an abusive parent how much more urgent is the case of a fetus removed to be killed?

Therefore the same rationality to assist those who are illiterate of or retarded due to the lack of understanding of the nature of the charges being presents for a plea. Due to being judicially injured, without civil rights, all you can do is remain silent as said in the reading and understand Miranda has to be read and not recited. A Convicted Felon has to be mirandized and represented before the court appointed attorney, due to their inability to represent self.

Public Information Laws North Carolina and the United States Federal Agencies

http://www.ncdoj.gov/getdoc/772f2676-8b51-417e-9cd9-90fbf7f79133/Understanding-Public-Records.aspx

Understanding Public Records

Questions and Answers:

 

1. What is the public policy regarding public records?

The North Carolina General Assembly has declared as a matter of public policy that the public records and public information compiled by agencies of North Carolina government or its subdivisions are the property of the people. N.C.G.S. § 132-1(b)

 

2. What are public records?

Public records are documentary materials that are either made or received by government agencies in North Carolina in carrying on public business. Public records include documents, papers, letters, maps, books, photographs, films, sound recordings, magnetic or other tapes, electronic data-processing records, artifacts or other documentary material, regardless of physical form or characteristic. N.C.G.S. § 132-1

 

3. Who may inspect or get copies of public records?

Any person may inspect and get copies of public records. N.C.G.S. § 132-6

 

4. To whom should a request for public records be directed?

The Public Records Law does not describe any specific procedure that a person must follow in requesting to inspect public records.  Normally, a request to any employee in a government office is sufficient to get access to records in that office. However, it is the custodian of public records who is specifically required to allow those records to be inspected. The public official in charge of an office is designated to be the custodian of records for that office. N.C.G..S. § 132-2

 

5. When are public records available for inspection or copying?

The Public Records Law says that inspection and examination of records should be allowed at “reasonable times” and under the reasonable supervision of the agency. “Reasonable times” is generally understood to mean during regular business hours. N.C.G.S. § 132-6

 

6. May citizens request copies of public records in any media available?

If an agency has the capability to provide copies of public records in different kinds of media (for example, in print or on computer disc), people requesting copies may choose to get copies in any and all the media available. People requesting copies of computer databases may be required to make their requests in writing. N.C.G.S. § 132-6.2(c)

 

7. May an agency charge fees for public records?

Government agencies may not charge fees for inspecting public records. Fees for certifying copies of public records are provided by law. However, unless otherwise provided by law, no public agency shall charge a fee for an uncertified copy of a public record that exceeds the actual cost to the public agency of making the copy. N.C.G.S. § 132-6.2(b)

 

8. Must a public agency provide information in verbal form?

The Public Records Law requires that government agencies permit people to inspect or get copies of information that is in recorded form. The law does not indicate that government agencies are required to provide information verbally to people who request it. N.C.G.S. § 132-6.2(e)

 

9. What about inspecting or getting copies of records that contain both public and confidential information?

Some records contain both public and confidential information. Government agencies may not refuse to permit inspection or to provide copies because public records contain some confidential information. Agencies must permit inspection and provide copies of the public, non-confidential parts of these records. N.C.G.S. § 132-6(c)

 

10. What are the remedies available if an agency refuses to release or disclose a public record?

Any person who is denied access to public records for the purposes of inspection or examination, and any person who is denied copies of public records, may bring a civil action in court against the government agency or official who is denying access or copies.

Courts are required to set public records suits for immediate hearings and to give hearings of these cases priority over other cases. The court may order the agency to permit inspection or provide copies if the court determines that the person seeking the records is entitled to them. N.C.G.S. § 132-9

 

11. Are certain government records exempt from disclosure?

The public records law exempts certain types of records from required disclosure. The law says that records containing certain communications between attorneys and their government clients, state tax information (N.C.G.S. § 132-1.1), trade secrets (N.C.G.S. § 132-1.2), certain lawsuit settlements (N.C.G.S. § 132-1.3), criminal investigation records (N.C.G.S. § 132-1.4), and records about industrial expansion (N.C.G.S. § 132-6(d)), are not public records.

Several statutes regulate public disclosure of personnel information of government employees. Although some personnel information is public (for example, name, age, date of employment, current position, title, current salary, date of most recent salary or position assignment change, location of current assignment and the written notice of final termination decision) personnel files of state, county and municipal employees are generally confidential. See N.C.G.S. §§ 126-22, 153A-98, 160A-168, 115C-321, 115D-29, 122C-158, 130A-42, 131E-97.1, 162A-6.1. These rules apply to personnel information for applicants, current employees and former employees.

 

12. If records containing “criminal investigation” information are not public records, does that mean that all law enforcement records are confidential?

N.C.G.S. § 132-1.4 (a) states that records of criminal investigations conducted by public law enforcement agencies or records of criminal intelligence information compiled by public law enforcement agencies are not public records. However, unless otherwise prohibited by law, certain information collected by public law enforcement agencies is public record as defined by the Public Records Law.

For example, the time, date, location and the nature of an apparent violation of the law reported to a public law enforcement agency, and the name, sex, age, address, employment and alleged violation of law of a person arrested, charged or indicted are public information. N.C.G.S. §132-1.4 (c) (1) & (2)

Note: State Bureau of Investigation (SBI) records are not public records and access to them is not available under the Public Records Law. Case law has held that access to SBI records is controlled entirely by N.C.G.S. § 114-15. Similarly, case law has held that prison records are confidential and are not subject to inspection by the public or by the inmate involved.

 

13. Does the Public Records Law cover access to records of federal agencies?

Records of federal agencies in North Carolina are not covered by the Public Records Law. However, in 1966, Congress passed the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. § 552) generally provides that any person has a right, enforceable in court, of access to federal agency records, except to the extent that such records (or portions thereof) are protected by one of the nine exemptions or by one to three special law enforcement record exclusions.

Persons seeking federal records under FOIA should contact an agency public information officer. If this informal contact is not successful, a formal written request should be filed. Appropriate contacts may be determined by calling the agency or by referencing the Federal Register, available in the documents sections of larger institutional libraries or through the state library.

 

 

Have Questions?

https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/388/218/case.html

Argument for the 6th Amendment

United States v. Wade, 388 U.S. 218 (1967)

The 6th Amendment – Litigation

United States v. Wade

No. 334

Argued February 16, 1967

Decided June 12, 1967

388 U.S. 218

CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS

FOR THE FIFTH CIRCUIT

 

fbi witness protection violation rights to cross examination of witness

The Jencks Act 18 U.S.C. Statute 3500

The Jencks Act, 18 U.S.C. § 3500, provides that the government (prosecutor) is required to produce a verbatim statement or report made by a government witness or prospective government witness (other than the defendant), but only after the witness has testified. Jencks material is evidence that is used in the course of a federal criminal prosecution in the United States. It usually consists of documents relied upon by government witnesses who testify at trial. The material is described as inculpatory, favoring the United States government’s prosecution of a criminal defendant. The Jencks Act also covers other documents related to the testimony, or relied upon by government witnesses at trial. Typically, the material may consist of police notes, memoranda, reports, summaries, letters, related to an indictment or verbatim transcripts used by government agents or employees to testify at trial.[1] This also includes a witness’s grand jury testimony, if the witness testified at trial.[2]

After the government’s witness testifies, the court must, upon motion of the defendant, order the government to produce any statement of the witness in the government’s possession relating to the subject matter as to which the witness testified. The court’s denial of such a motion by a defendant is reversible error, although the court need not order the disclosure sua sponte.[3] The usual remedy for failure of the government to produce the documents is a mistrial and dismissal of criminal charges against the defendant.[4]

Call United States Department of Justice – Civil Rights Division: 1- 301 583 7350

Under the Jencks Act, every record and the name and fictitious name of any and all witnesses protected by the FBI Witness Protection Program, must be upload as public information on the Official FBI vault website.  This is the duty of the Department of Justice, to be carried out with due diligence and in sound mind and memory, for the people, who this information belongs and to the accused as a their right to cross-examination in all future court appeals.

One Spirit Many Parts

  DBA Jesus Christ

One thought on “  ROE v. DBA Jesus Christ (U.S.S.C) 2017

  1. Pingback: You Don’t Work You Don’t Eat Explained | DBAJesusChrist.org

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